Sunita Devi

Verified email at gmail.com

Assistant Professor (Microbiology)
Dr. Yashwant Singh Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Solan



                       

https://researchid.co/sunitachamba

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Soil and Environmental Microbiology And Microbial Enzymes

15

Scopus Publications

Scopus Publications

  • Diversity and plant growth-promoting potential of actinomycetes associated with the rhizosphere of Arnebia euchroma from Himachal Pradesh (India)
    S. Devi, , P. Sharma, A. Rana, J. Pal, A. Kumari, , , , and

    Journal of Environmental Biology, ISSN: 02548704, eISSN: 23940379, Pages: 964-972, Published: July 2021 Triveni Enterprises
    Aim: The present study aimed to explicate the diversity and plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of actinomycetes present in the rhizosphere of an endangered medicinal plant, Arnebia euchroma. Methodology: Rhizospheric soil samples of A. euchroma collected from trans-Himalayan region of Himachal Pradesh were processed for elucidating actinomycetes diversity and load by employing Standard Plate Count Technique. All recovered isolates were screened for their PGP potential using standard protocols. The potential strains were identified through 16SrRNA ribotyping and were deposited in the National Culture Collection Centre, NCMR, Pune, (India). Results: The rhizosphere of A. euchroma harboured a great deal of actinomycetes diversity (33 diverse morphotypes). Starch casein agar was best for isolating the actinomycetes. The same actinomycete isolate showed variations in their morphological features including pigments production on different isolation media. They exhibited multifarious plant growth-promoting activities like P- solubilization, phytase activity, N- fixation, siderophore production etc. The potential isolates were identified as Streptomyces silaceus CA7 (MK836019) and Streptomyces rectiviolaceus NA8 (MK836018). Interpretation: The actinomycetes evinced a considerable plant growth promoting potential that might be helpful in the adaptation and perpetuation of A. euchroma under prevailing harsh environmental conditions of Himachal Pradesh.

  • Antibacterial potential of hive bees honey from Himachal Pradesh, India
    Sunita Devi, Akwal Parihar, Meena Thakur, Bharti Thakur, and Harish Kumar Sharma

    Archives of Microbiology, ISSN: 03028933, eISSN: 1432072X, Published: 2021 Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    This paper presents a pioneer study on the microbial diversity and antibacterial potential of hive bees (Apis cerana and A. mellifera) honey collected from Himachal Pradesh. In total, 26 bacteria (14 from A. cerana and 12 from A. mellifera) but no fungal isolate were recovered. Bee species and locations comparison in terms of bacterial load (log CFU/g) revealed maximum loads of 3.74 and 3.99 in the honey from A. cerana and Mandi location, respectively. The most prevalent strains (HC3, HC5, HC6, HC8 and HM2) were identified (16S rRNA ribotyping) as Staphylococcus haemolyticus (MT742636), "Bacillus subtilis subsp. stecoris" (MT742637), Bacillus safensis subsp. safensis (MT742638), "Bacillus zanthoxyli" (MT742639) and Bacillus safensis subsp. safensis (MT938911). The apiary honey displayed good to excellent inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli ATCC1041 whereas, fair to good against Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC10662, Salmonella typhi NCTC786 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC13883, highlighting its use as a therapeutic agent. Furthermore, it can be effective in minimizing numerous side effects associated with the consumption of synthetic drugs for treating bacterial infections thereby signifying the role of honey as a healthier substitute for synthetic drugs.

  • Physicochemical characteristics and mineral status of honey from different agro-climatic zones of Himachal Pradesh, India
    Meena Thakur, Neha Gupta, Harish Kumar Sharma, and Sunita Devi

    British Food Journal, ISSN: 0007070X, Published: 2021 Emerald
    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to assess the quality of honey from different agro-climatic zones of Himachal Pradesh in terms of physicochemical characteristics and mineral status.Design/methodology/approachThree honey-producing locations were selected within each agro-climatic zone, honey sampled from four separate apiaries within each location and analyzed for physicochemical characteristics and mineral status using standard methodologies. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance with one-way classification, after appropriate transformation through online OP-STAT software and MS Excel. The correlation coefficient (r) was also calculated. Principal component analysis was done using XL-STAT software.FindingsThe honey of Zone 4 had highest fructose (36.62%), F:G ratio (1.55), acidity (46.07 meq/kg), vitamin C (25.04 mg/100 g) and diastase (19.22 DN), whereas the pollen density (76,666.67 pollen grains per 10 g), pH (5.94), sucrose (6.94%), hydroxy methyl furfuraldehyde (70.20 mg/kg), amino acid (103.83 mg/100 g), phenols (77.39 mg/100 g), Ca (81.04 mg/kg) and K (354.17 mg/kg) were highest for Zone 2. Highest electrical conductivity (0.24 mS/cm), moisture (16.50 %), glucose (34.20%) and P content (62.93 mg/kg) were recorded for Zone 1. Correlation studies indicated a significant positive correlation between pH and EC; EC and moisture; colour and pollen density. Examining the graphical distribution of the honey samples, a natural separation between honeys of four different agro-climatic zones was obtained.Originality/valueThe impact of geographical/agro-climatic variations in physicochemical characteristics of honey has not been worked out under the present scenario in Himachal Pradesh.

  • Microbiological status of drinking water sources and its relationship with human health in Solan, India
    A. Singh, S. Bhardwaj and S. Devi

    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, ISSN: 01676369, eISSN: 15732959, Volume: 193, Published: January 2021
    In Solan district, the developmental activities associated with chemical based farming, rapid urbanization, and rampant industrialization have led to many diarrhoeal, gastroenteritis, and hepatitis disease outbreaks. This has necessitated for microbiological assessment of indicator organisms, the thermotolerant coliforms, in drinking water sources, and their relationship with diarrhoeal disease. All the 49 Public Health Institutes (PHIs) of the district were categorized into very low, low, moderate, and high disease burden regions by stratification method. For drinking water, 55.5, 16.5, and 17% people preferred springs, borewells, and hand-pump respectively. These sources inventoried by Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice survey in one of very low and seven of high disease burden regions, and were analyzed by multiple tube fermentation technique. A cross-sectional survey of 200 children was undertaken for diarrhoeal disease estimation. Parwanoo, an industrial and Kurgal, a non industrial region witnessed highest (30.20) and lowest (4.40) Most Probable Number (MPN) per 100 ml water of thermotolerant coliforms, respectively. Thermotolerant coliforms were also observed significantly more (16.77 MPN/100 ml water) in monsoon than in post monsoon season (9.04 MPN per 100 ml water). The thermotolerant coliform Escherichia coli was recovered from six and three water sources respectively during monsoon and post monsoon. A strong correlation ( r = 0.78) existed between the diarrhoeal disease occurrence and the concentration of thermotolerant coliforms in monsoon whereas it was moderate ( r = 0.61) in post monsoon. The study indicated more contamination of water sources due to industrial activities which further got aggravated during the rainy season of the region.

  • Screening, identification, and colonization of fungal root endophytes against Dematophora necatrix: a ubiquitous pathogen of fruit trees
    Joginder Pal, Satish K. Sharma, Sunita Devi, Ranjna Sharma, Hans Raj, Monika Karn, Shalini Verma, Pulla Reddy Vedukola, and Anju Sharma

    Egyptian Journal of Biological Pest Control, ISSN: 11101768, eISSN: 25369342, Published: 1 December 2020 Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Abstract The goal of the present research was to ascertain the potential root endophytic fungi against Dematophora necatrix, Hartig, the causal pathogen of white root rot in apples; however, it has an expanded range of hosts across different fruit trees. Out of 36 endophytic fungi segregated from symptomless roots of apple, wheat, maize, marigold, cherry, and garlic plants, only 9 isolates showed inhibitory effect during preliminary screening and were further assayed under in vitro, pot, and field conditions against the white root rot pathogen/disease. Under in vitro conditions, maximum mycelial inhibition of 81.48% was obtained with the isolate Aspergillus aculeatus strain C2. Microscopic studies on interaction between fungal endophyte with hyphal tips of D. necatrix revealed various morphological abnormalities in the hyphae. In glasshouse conditions, seed treatment pursued by soil application with Crinipellis tabtim strain M8 isolate was highly effective and exhibited 93.55% disease control. Similarly, under field conditions, the overall maximum disease control was exhibited by Crinipellis tabtim strain M8 (84.95%). The most promising root endophytes that were identified rely on morphological and ITS sequence analysis. Root colonization assay was performed which revealed maximum endosphere and rhizosphere colonization with Crinipellis tabtim strain M8. Additionally, confocal microscopic illustrations of transverse sections of root cells tenanted by fungal endophytes as compared to untreated control suggested the persistence and establishment of endophytes in the endosphere of apple seedlings. These findings present the first report on colonization of apple roots by fungal root endophytes suggesting an alternative and sustainable approach for management of white root rot disease.

  • Monitoring of purity and stability of CRMs of multiclass pesticides during prolonged storage before and after expiration
    Krishan Kumar Sharma, Vandana Tripathy, Rahul Gautam, Ruchi Gupta, Amol Tayade, Khushbu Sharma, Rajbir Yadav, Poonam Shukla, Suneeta Devi, Priya Pandey, Gitansh Singh, Shobhita Kalra, and Suresh Walia

    Accreditation and Quality Assurance, ISSN: 09491775, eISSN: 14320517, Pages: 89-97, Published: 1 April 2020 Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Certified reference materials (CRMs) are the backbone for qualitative and quantitative determination of pesticides in technical materials, formulations, and food matrices. However, their stringent expiry date, limited shelf life, and diminishing purity with time, limits their use beyond expiry. Stability study of 89 CRMs of multiclass pesticides, stored at − 25 °C, has been conducted to assess the purity of CRMs beyond their expiry date. It was evident that > 96 % of the CRMs remained optimally stable with respect to their observed purity even after their expiry date as per certificate of analysis. Percentage deviations in purity of expired and valid CRMs posited well below 7 % and are within ± 10 % acceptable range as recommended by the SANTE. During 2013–2017, performance of the valid and expired CRMs was evaluated through 44 z -scores obtained in 14 international and national proficiency testing programmes. All the z -scores received for 15 expired and 29 valid CRMs were found satisfactory. Inter-laboratory comparison of 6 randomly selected expired and valid CRMs was tested at three different ISO/IEC 17025 accredited laboratories and their % difference between purities ranged from − 2.35 % to + 0.95 %. It was inferred that by maintaining proper storage conditions and continuous monitoring of purity, the expired CRMs can give comparable results as valid CRMs.

  • Development, validation of QuEChERS-based method for simultaneous determination of multiclass pesticide residue in milk, and evaluation of the matrix effect
    Vandana Tripathy, Krishan Kumar Sharma, Rajbir Yadav, Suneeta Devi, Amol Tayade, Khushbu Sharma, Priya Pandey, Gitansh Singh, Amar Nath Patel, Rahul Gautam, Ruchi Gupta, Shobhita Kalra, Poonam Shukla, Suresh Walia, and Najam Akhtar Shakil

    Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part B Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes, ISSN: 03601234, eISSN: 15324109, Pages: 394-406, Published: 4 May 2019 Informa UK Limited
    Abstract Extraction and quantification of pesticide residue from the milk matrix at or below the established maximum residue limit (MRL) is a challenging task for both analytical chemists and the regulatory institutions to take corrective actions for the human health and safety. The main aim of the study is to develop a simple rapid and less expensive QuEChERS extraction and cleanup method for simultaneous analysis of 41 multiclass pesticide residue in milk by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD), followed by confirmation of the residues with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Effect of sorbent type, temperature, spiking concentration, matrix effect (ME), measurement uncertainty (MU), inter- and intra-assay repeatability, reproducibility of recovery, and trueness of the results were investigated to validate the effectiveness of the method. Limit of determination (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all the analytes ranged within 0.001–0.02 and 0.002–0.05 µg mL−1, respectively. The % recovery of all the pesticides ranged between 91.38 and 117.56% with relative standard deviation (RSD) below 2.79%. The MU for all the analytes was ≤29% of respective LOQs, and except for few pesticides, the ME was largely negative. The method fulfilled all the SANTE guidelines and thus can be extended for routine analysis of multiclass pesticide residue in milk.

  • A novel and discernible plate assay method for the qualitative screening of bacterial keratinases
    Indian Journal of Biotechnology, ISSN: 09725849, eISSN: 09750967, Pages: 174-180, Published: 2019

  • Persistence, dissipation and consumer risk assessment of a combination formulation of flubendiamide and deltamethrin on cucumber
    K.K. Sharma, V. Shashi Bhushan, Cherukuri Sreenivasa Rao, K. Narsimha Reddy, Hemanta Banerjee, Swagata Mandal, Balwinder Singh, R.S. Battu, Gagan Jyot, S.K. Sahoo, Soudamini Mohapatra, S. Lekha, Gourishankar Manikrao, B. Radhika, Vandana Tripathy, Rajbir Yadav, Poonam Shukla, Amar Nath Patel, Gitansh Singh, Suneeta Devi, Priya Pandey, Rahul Gautam, Shobhita Kalra, Ruchi Gupta, Geeta Singh, Madhuban Gopal, and Suresh Walia

    Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment, ISSN: 19440049, eISSN: 19440057, Pages: 498-511, Published: 4 March 2018 Informa UK Limited
    ABSTRACT Multi-location supervised field trials were conducted in India at four locations of the All India Network Project (AINP) on Pesticide Residues to study the persistence, dissipation and risk assessment of flubendiamide and deltamethrin on cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Residues of flubendiamide and deltamethrin on cucumber resulting from three spray applications of a combination formulation (flubendiamide 90% + deltamethrin 60%, 150 SC) at recommended (22.5 + 15 g a.i./ha) and double the recommended (45 + 30 g a.i./ha) dose were analysed. On the basis of persistence and dissipation studies, the half- life (T1/2) of flubendiamide on cucumber varied from 1.40 to 2.98 (recommended dose) and 1.55 to 2.76 days (double the recommended dose), while that of deltamethrin ranged from 2.5 to 4.9 (recommended dose) and 2.7 to 3.9 days (double the recommended dose) at the four locations. On the basis of supervised field trial data and using OECD calculator, MRLs in the combination product of 3 mg kg−1 for flubendiamide and 1.5 mg kg−1 for deltamethrin has been proposed for consideration by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). Codex, EU and EPA have fixed MRL of 0.2 mg kg−1 for flubendiamide and deltamethrin.

  • Versatility and commercial status of microbial keratinases: a review
    Ruchi Sharma and Sunita Devi

    Reviews in Environmental Science and Biotechnology, ISSN: 15691705, eISSN: 15729826, Pages: 19-45, Published: 1 March 2018 Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    The world’s increasing population and shortage of food and feed is creating an urgently for us to look for new protein sources from waste products like keratinous waste. Poor management of these wastes has made them one of the major recalcitrant pollutants in nature. Microbial keratinases offers an economic and eco-friendly alternative for degrading and recycling keratinous waste into valuable byproducts. Diverse groups of microorganisms viz., bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes have the ability to degrade recalcitrant keratin by producing keratinase enzyme. Microbial keratinases exhibits great diversity in its biochemical properties with respect to activity and stability in various pH and temperature ranges as well as in the range of recalcitrant proteins it degrades like those present in feathers, hairs, nails, hooves etc. Owing to diverse properties and multifarious biotechnological implications, keratinases can be considered as promising biocatalysts for preparation of animal nutrients, protein supplements, leather processing, fiber modification, detergent formulation, feather meal processing for feed and fertilizer, the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and biomedical industries, and waste management. This review article presents an overview of keratin structure and composition, mechanism of microbial keratinolysis, diversity of keratinolytic microorganisms, and their potential applications in various fields.

  • Antifungal potential of hot spring water of Manikaran, Himachal Pradesh (India)
    S. Devi, , S.S. Kanwar, and

    Journal of Environmental Biology, ISSN: 02548704, eISSN: 23940379, Pages: 217-221, Published: March 2017 Triveni Enterprises

  • Practices in bioleaching: A review on clean and economic alternative for safe and green environment
    M. Goyal and D. Verma

    Engineering Interventions in Agricultural Processing, Pages: 147-178, Published: 1 January 2017 Apple Academic Press

  • Persistence and risk assessment of spiromesifen on tomato in India: a multilocational study
    K. K. Sharma, Irani Mukherjee, Balwinder Singh, Kousik Mandal, Sanjay K. Sahoo, Hemanta Banerjee, Tirthankar Banerjee, Sankhajit Roy, Paresh G. Shah, Hemlatta K. Patel, Anil R. Patel, S. Naseema Beevi, Thomas George, Thomas B. Mathew, Geeta Singh, Rajbir Noniwal, and Sunita Devi

    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, ISSN: 01676369, eISSN: 15732959, Volume: 186, Pages: 8453-8461, Published: 1 December 2014 Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Supervised field trials were conducted at four different agro-climatic locations of India to evaluate the dissipation pattern and risk assessment of spiromesifen on tomato. Spiromesifen 240 SC was sprayed on tomato at 150 and 300 g a.i. ha−1. Samples of tomato fruits were drawn at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 days after treatment and soil at 15 days after treatment. Quantification of residues was done on gas chromatograph–mass spectrophotometer in selective ion monitoring mode in the mass range of 271–274 (m/z). The limit of quantification of the method was found to be 0.05 mg kg−1, while the limit of determination was 0.015 mg kg−1. Residues were found below the LOQ of 0.05 mg kg−1 in 10 days at both the doses of application at all the locations. Spiromesifen dissipated with a half-life of 0.93–1.38 days at the recommended rate of application and 1.04–1.34 days at the double the rate of application. Residues of spiromesifen in soil were detectable level (<0.05 mg kg−1) after 15 days of treatment. A preharvest interval (PHI) of 1 day has been recommended on tomato on the basis of data generated under All India Network Project on Pesticide Residues. Spiromesifen 240 SC has been registered for its use on tomato by Central Insecticide Board and Registration Committee, Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India. The maximum residue limit (MRL) of spiromesifen on tomato has been fixed by Food Safety Standard Authority of India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India as 0.3 μg/g after its risk assessment.

  • Residual behavior and risk assessment of flubendiamide on tomato at different agro-climatic conditions in India
    K. K. Sharma, Irani Mukherjee, Balwinder Singh, Sanjay K. Sahoo, N. S. Parihar, B. N. Sharma, V. D. Kale, R. V. Nakat, A. R. Walunj, Saudamini Mohapatra, A. K. Ahuja, Debi Sharma, Geeta Singh, Rajbir Noniwal, and Sunita Devi

    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, ISSN: 01676369, eISSN: 15732959, Volume: 186, Pages: 7673-7682, Published: 3 October 2014 Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Supervised field trials were conducted at four different agro-climatic zones in India to evaluate the dissipation pattern and risk assessment of flubendiamide on tomato. Flubendiamide 480 SC was sprayed on tomato at 48 and 96 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha−1. Samples of tomato fruits were drawn at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, and 20 days after treatment. Quantification of residues was done on a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) device with a photo diode array detector. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of this method was found to be 0.01 mg kg−1 while limit of detection (LOD) being 0.003 mg kg−1. Residues of flubendiamide were found below the determination limit of 0.01 mg kg−1 in 20 days at both the dosages in all the locations. The half-life of flubendiamide at an application rate of 48 g a.i. ha−1 varied from 0.33 to 3.28 days and at 48-g a.i. ranged from 1.21 to 3.00 days. On the basis of data generated under the All India Network Project on Pesticide Residues, a preharvest interval (PHI) of 1 day has been recommended, and the flubendiamide 480 SC has been registered for its use on tomato by the Central Insecticide Board and Registration Committee, Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India. The maximum residue limit (MRL) of flubendiamide on tomato has been fixed by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India under Food Safety Standard Authority of India, as 0.07 μg g−1 after its risk assessment.

  • Safety evaluation of flubendiamide and its metabolites on cabbage and persistence in soil in different agroclimatic zones of India
    K. K. Sharma, Saudamini Mohapatra, A. K. Ahuja, M. Deepa, Debi Sharma, G. K. Jagdish, N. Rashmi, R. S. Battu, S. K. Sharma, Balwinder Singh, N. S. Parihar, B. N. Sharma, V. D. Kale, R. V. Nakat, A. R. Walnuj, Geeta Singh, Kuldeep K. Ravivanshi, Suneeta Devi, and Rajbir Noniwal

    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, ISSN: 01676369, eISSN: 15732959, Volume: 186, Pages: 3633-3639, Published: June 2014 Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Supervised field trials following good agricultural practices were conducted at the research farms of four agricultural universities located at four different agroclimatic zones of India to evaluate the persistence and dissipation of flubendiamide and its metabolite, des-iodo flubendiamide, on cabbage. Two spray applications of flubendiamide 480 SC of standard and double dose at the rate of 24 and 48 g a.i. ha−1 were given to the crop at a 15-day interval, and the residues of flubendiamide 2 h after spray were found in the range of 0.107–0.33 and 0.20–0.49 mg kg−1 at respective doses. Residue of des-iodo flubendiamide was not detected in any cabbage sample during study period. No residues were found in the soil samples collected from all treated fields after 15 days of application. On the basis of data generated under All India Network Project on Pesticide Residues, a preharvest interval (PHI) of 10 days has been recommended, and the flubendiamide 480 SC has been registered for its use on cabbage by Central Insecticide Board and Registration Committee, Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India. The maximum residue limit (MRL) of flubendiamide on cabbage has been fixed by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, under Food Safety Standard Authority of India as 0.05 μg/g after its risk assessment.