Howard K. Butcher; RN; PhD, FAAN

@fau.edu

Professor and Director of PhD Program Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing
Florida Atlantic University



                       

https://researchid.co/hbutcher

EDUCATION

BS Biology: Lebanon Valley College
BSN Thomas Jefferson University
MScN University of Toronto
PhD University of South Carolina
Post-Doc-John A. Hartford Foundation Building Academic Geriatric Nursing
Capacity

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC
Nursing Theory Guided Research, Practice, and Education
Unitary Caring Nursing Science
Rogers Science of Unitary Human Beings
Dispiritedness and Mild Depression in Later Life
Testing Written Emotional Expression to enhance Meaning-Making

53

Scopus Publications

9348

Scholar Citations

33

Scholar h-index

65

Scholar i10-index

Scopus Publications

  • Heuristic Research in Nursing Science
    Howard K. Butcher

    SAGE Publications
    The purpose of this article is to reintroduce and describe the processes and phases of heuristic inquiry and to illustrate how the method can advance nursing science. Heuristic inquiry is a rigorous, systematic, phenomenologically orientated research method developed by Clark Moustakas for investigating, discovering, and understanding the nature and meaning of living experiences. Heuristic inquiry invites the inclusion of the researcher’s autobiographical living of experience being investigated honoring the personal experiences of the phenomenon from self and each participant in the research study. The author proposes that heuristic inquiry be used in nursing science by including a theoretical interpretive process connecting the thematic essences of the nursing conceptual framework guiding the study. Nursing theory-guided heuristic research advances the study of caring for persons experiencing human-environmental-health transitions to enhance human betterment and wellbecoming.

  • The Role of Metaphor in Hermeneutic Research
    Howard K. Butcher

    SAGE Publications
    The identification and interpretation of metaphor is useful to hermeneutic research. Metaphor is a way of conceiving one concept in terms of another and serves as a function of understanding. The author explores the rise of hermeneutics research and its relevance to nurse artsciencing. Metaphors are a creative strategy hermeneutic researchers can use to analyze and interpret data, and serve as a powerful strategy to represent complex realities, illuminate unnoticed aspects of a phenomenon, and provide depth of meaning to the understanding of human experiences.

  • The Uncertainty in Family Caregivers of Hospitalized Persons With a Stroke in Saudi Arabia Unitary Caring Perspective
    Seham Alselami, Howard K. Butcher, and Joy Longo

    Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
    Uncertainty is a universal experience of family caregivers caring for persons with a stroke and affects caregivers' readiness to care for their family members with a stroke. Guided by the unitary caring theory and unitary-caring hermeneutic-phenomenological research method, this study was conducted among 15 family caregivers of persons in the hospital who have survived strokes through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Five essences emerged from the analysis: living in a dark reality; yearning for professional support; enduring a life full of tribulations; attempting resolution; and creating new patterns of living. Each of the 5 essences was interpreted from Smith's unitary caring theory perspective.

  • Originating Research Ideas
    Howard K. Butcher

    SAGE Publications
    Research aimed at generating new knowledge is the heart of the scholarship of discovery. The author of this paper explores how original research ideas can be generated for formal investigations and artsciencing. Curiosity and creativity are presented as “seeds” for originating ideas, and seven patterns (adjacent possible, liquid networks, the slow hunch, serendipity, error, exaptation, and platforms) are described as synergistic potentiators for geminating original research ideas.

  • Cultivating Awe: A Means to Inspire Sciencing
    Howard K. Butcher

    SAGE Publications
    Awe is an emotion involving a feeling of being in the presence of something vast that transcends one’s current understanding of the world and is associated with creating a sense of wonder and curiosity. The author explores how awe experiences can have a role in igniting and sustaining research endeavors, and how nurse researchers can cultivate everyday awe experiences as sources of inspiration when engaged in the art of nurse sciencing.

  • Biographical Narrative Research From the Perspective of the Science of Unitary Human Beings: A Methodological Approach
    Yamileth Castaño Mora, Beatriz Elena Arias López, and Howard K. Butcher

    SAGE Publications
    Narrating or storytelling is a fundamental practice for human survival and a means for finding meaning in experiences and for enhancing self-understanding. The use of story has been present in nursing since its origins. Biographical narrative has rarely been used as a research method in nursing, and there are no examples conceptualizing biographical narrative research methods within a unitary science perspective. The purpose of this paper is to describe one specific narrative methodological approach—the biographical narrative research method—and to link the method to the science of unitary human beings as a means of creating a unitary understanding of the storied nature of human-health experiences.

  • A Unitary Caring Theory Perspective of Labyrinth Walking Research
    Howard Karl Butcher

    SAGE Publications
    The purpose of this narrative review of labyrinth walking research literature was to identify its experiences and potential health benefits and to conceptualize the labyrinth walking experience within Smith’s (2020) unitary caring theory. A total of 29 research studies from a 2022 annotated bibliography of 160 publications on labyrinth related research were selected for analysis. The findings coalesced around four themes. Labyrinth walking is an experience of irenic requiescence; expanding awareness; transforming potentials; and connecting to the beyond. A process of interpretive theorizing was used to interpret each theme from the perspective of the concepts within the theory of unitary caring.

  • Factors that influence health literacy in patients with coronary artery disease
    Ana Caroline da Costa, Ana Paula da Conceição, Howard Karl Butcher, and Rita de Cassia Gengo e Silva Butcher

    FapUNIFESP (SciELO)
    Objective: to investigate the factors that exert an influence on health literacy in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: a crosssectional study, including 122 patients with coronary diseases (60.7% male; 62.07 ± 8.8 years old). Health literacy and specific knowledge about the disease were evaluated through interviews with the participants by means of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults and the Short version of the coronary artery disease education questionnaire. The data were described by means of central tendency measures and frequencies. The factors that exert an influence on health literacy were determined by means of a linear regression model. The significance level adopted was 5%. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. Results: age and arterial hypertension presented an inverse and significant relationship with health literacy. On the other hand, higher schooling levels and having a job were associated with better scores in the health literacy instrument. Specific knowledge about the disease did not exert any influence on health literacy. The variables included in the regression model explained 55.3% of inadequate literacy. Conclusion: this study, knowledge about the disease exerts no influence on health literacy: however, the professionals should consider the sociodemographic and clinical factors to plan the interventions.

  • Factors that influence health literacy in patients with coronary artery disease
    Ana Caroline da Costa, Ana Paula da Conceição, Howard Karl Butcher, and Rita de Cassia Gengo e Silva Butcher

    FapUNIFESP (SciELO)
    Objetivo: investigar los factores que influyen en la alfabetización en salud de los pacientes con enfermedad arterial coronaria. Método: estudio transversal, que incluyó 122 pacientes con enfermedades coronarias (60,7% del sexo masculino; 62,07±8,8 años); se evaluó la alfabetización en salud y el conocimiento específico sobre la enfermedad mediante entrevistas con los participantes, utilizando el Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults e Short version of the coronary artery disease education questionnaire. Los datos fueron descritos por medidas de tendencia central y frecuencias. Los factores que influyen en la alfabetización en salud se determinaron mediante un modelo de regresión lineal. El nivel de significación adoptado fue del 5%. El estudio fue aprobado por el Comité de Ética e Investigación. Resultados: la edad y la hipertensión mostraron una relación inversa y significativa con la alfabetización en salud. Por otro lado, un mayor nivel educativo y tener empleo se asociaron con puntajes más altos en el instrumento de alfabetización en salud. El conocimiento específico sobre la enfermedad no influyó en la alfabetización en salud. Las variables del modelo de regresión explicaron el 55,3% de alfabetización inadecuada. Conclusión: en el presente estudio, se concluyó que el conocimiento sobre la enfermedad no influye en la alfabetización en salud, pero los profesionales deben considerar los factores sociodemográficos y clínicos para planificar las intervenciones.

  • Community-Based Participatory Research Guided by Critical Caring Theory
    Howard Karl Butcher

    SAGE Publications
    While community-based participatory research (CBPR) and other related participatory action research approaches are increasingly being used in nursing research, few of these studies are conceptualized within an extant nursing framework. Instead, CBPR is typically only grounded in socio-ecological and social justice frameworks. However, knowledge is developed in a discipline through research that is conceptualized within the discipline’s conceptual systems, frameworks, or theories. This article begins with an explication of the processes and theoretical foundations of CBPR and concludes by offering Falk-Rafael’s Critical Caring Theory (CCT) as an ideal theory for reframing CBPR within a nursing science perspective.

  • Unitary Caring Science: A Hermeneutic-Phenomenological Research Method
    Howard K. Butcher

    SAGE Publications
    All phenomenological research, including descriptive phenomenological methods, are theory based. The knowledge in a discipline is built using discipline-specific methods. The purpose of this article is to develop and describe the processes of a mode of inquiry specific to caring in nursing theories housed within the unitary caring paradigm. Morgan’s practical framework examining ontological-epistemological-methodological linkages was used to develop the unitary-caring hermeneutic phenomenological research method The method is specific to conducting hermeneutic phenomenological research within Watson’s unitary caring science and Smith’s theory of unitary caring. The method includes a process of linking and interpreting themes generated from the textual analysis of participant descriptions of the caring phenomena to concepts in the specific unitary caring theory that informs the researcher’s a priori theoretical perspective to develop a theoretical understanding of the experience and contribute to the development of unitary caring nursing science.

  • A Unitary Caring Theory Perspective of Family Caregiving for Patients Hospitalized With a Stroke in Saudi Arabia
    Seham Alselami and Howard K. Butcher

    SAGE Publications
    The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the experience of Saudi informal family caregivers of hospitalized patients who have experienced a stroke. In-depth, face-to-face, semistructured interviews of five family caregivers using open-ended questions were conducted in a major hospital in Saudi Arabia. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using the unitary-caring hermeneutic phenomenological research method. Data analysis revealed six major essences that were synthesized into one statement reflecting the essence of caring for a family member with a stroke in Saudi Arabia: Living with the uncertainty of ambiguity amid feeling distressed with worries and fears replete with unfulfilled desires while yearning for compassionate caring and overcoming uncertainties through connections and faith honoring abiding commitments. As a means to transform the findings into theory and language of the nursing discipline, the essences were then interpreted within the theory of unitary caring.

  • The Experience of Depression Relapse among Adult Thai Patients with Depressive Disorder: A Qualitative Study
    Kasorn Muijeen, Rangsiman Soonthornchaiya, and Howard K. Butcher

    Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.
    Background: Depression is an illness with widespread incidence and has shown an annual increase, while depression relapse is also rising continually due to multiple causes. In Thailand, although many studies have been conducted to prevent depression incidence and relapse, there is little known about the meaning of depression relapse in adult Thai patients. An exploration of the direct experiences of adult Thai patients seems a suitable way to gather data for a care system development. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of adult Thai patients concerning their experience of depression relapse and its management among adult patients with depressive disorder in the Thai context. Methods: This research is a qualitative study using the directed content analysis approach. In-depth interviews with 20 adult Thai patients with depression that had direct experience with depression relapse were the participants used in this study. The interviews allowed the participants to talk about their experiences with depression relapse and how they managed depressive symptoms; the interviews lasted approximately 60 minutes. Results: Two themes emerged from the study. First, the experience of depression relapse is the feeling pulled away from happiness. Second, managing depression relapse. Conclusion: Depression relapse among adult Thai patients with depressive disorder is an experience causing patients to feel that they are losing their happiness again. Care and management of depression relapse by each patient differ, despite being in the same social contexts. Therefore, depression relapse risk assessment is important in the care of each patient in order to design more effective care.

  • Motivational interviewing: Validation of a proposed NIC nursing intervention in persons with a severe mental illness
    Pilar Lozano, Howard K. Butcher, Cecilia Serrano, Aurelio Carrasco, Carolina Lagares, Pilar Lusilla, and Cristina O'Ferral

    Wiley
    INTRODUCTION Low adherence to treatment is a common problem in the care of patients with severe mental illnesses. Motivational interviewing is a directive, client-centered counseling therapeutic approach designed to elicit behavior change by helping clients to explore and resolve ambivalence. Nurses use motivational interviewing, although it has not been defined from a nursing perspective nor with nursing language. Thus, nursing research on the use of these techniques is being carried out, supported by their effectiveness in many health problems. The development of motivational interviewing as a standardized nursing intervention for inclusion in the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) may promote its use by mental health nurses in their daily work and thus improve the quality of care. OBJECTIVES To validate a proposed motivational interviewing nursing intervention for inclusion in the NIC. MATERIALS AND METHODS We followed the validation methodology of the NIC of the Iowa and the Intervention Normalization for Nursing Practice projects. The study comprised theoretical (scientific and expert validation) and empirical (terminological and clinical validation) phases. RESULTS There is ample evidence supporting the efficiency of the motivational interviewing to improve the therapeutic adherence of people with severe mental illness. The group of experts agreed on the label name "motivational interviewing" for the NIC based on the modified model by Miller & Röllnick (2015), which includes 28 associated activities through the phases of engaging, focusing, evoking, and planning. Development of the NANDA International and the Nursing Outcomes Classification nursing language was completed. Knowledge and drug attitude improved in the motivational intervention group. CONCLUSIONS We validated the nursing intervention motivational interviewing for inclusion in the NIC that will help improve therapeutic adherence. The intervention may be used for other behavioral changes.

  • Blood Pressure Control and Adherence to Drug Treatment in Patients with Hypertension Treated at a Specialized Outpatient Clinic: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Mayra Cristina Luz Pádua Guimarães, Juliana Chaves Coelho, Giovanio Vieira da Silva, Luciano Ferreira Drager, Rita de Cassia Gengo e Silva Butcher, Howard K Butcher, and Angela Maria Geraldo Pierin

    Informa UK Limited
    Objective To evaluate and identify variables associated with the control of hypertension and adherence to antihypertensive drug treatment in a group of patients with hypertension monitored in a specialized, highly complex outpatient service. Methods A prospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in the hypertension unit of a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients diagnosed with hypertensive aged 18 years and over and accompanied for at least six months were included in the study. Patients with secondary hypertension and pregnant women were excluded. The sample consisted of 253 patients. Adherence/concordance to antihypertensive treatment was assessed using the Morisky Green Levine Scale. Blood pressure control was set for values less than 140/90 mmHg. Variables with p≤0.20 in univariate analysis were included in multiple logistic regression. The level of significance adopted was p ≤0.05. Results Most of patients were white, married and women, with a mean age of 65 (13.3) years old, low income, and education levels. Blood pressure control and adherence were observed in 69.2% and 90.1% of the patients, respectively. Variables that were independently associated with blood pressure control were (OR, odds ratio; CI, 95% confidence interval): married marital status (OR 2.3; CI 1.34–4.28), use of calcium channel blockers (OR 0.4; CI 0.19–0.92) and number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs (OR 0.78; CI 0.66–0.92). Adherence was not associated with any of the variables studied. Conclusion There was a high frequency of patients with satisfactory adherence to antihypertensive drug treatment. Blood pressure control was less frequent and was associated with social and treatment-related factors.


  • Brazilian Nursing Process Research Network contributions for assistance in the COVID-19 pandemic
    Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite de Barros, Viviane Martins da Silva, Rosimere Ferreira Santana, Agueda Maria Ruiz Zimmer Cavalcante, Allyne Fortes Vitor, Amália de Fatima Lucena, Anamaria Alves Napoleão, Camila Takao Lopes, Cândida Caniçali Primo, Elenice Valentim Carmona,et al.

    FapUNIFESP (SciELO)
    ABSTRACT Objective: to describe the theoretical construction process of nursing process support documents in COVID-19 care scenarios. Methods: an experience report of the joint activity of the Brazilian Nursing Process Research Network (Rede de Pesquisa em Processo de Enfermagem) composed of Higher Education and Health Institution researchers in Brazil. Results: five instruments were organized collectively, involving the elements of nursing practice (nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions) in assistance for community; for patients (with suspected or mild, moderate, and critical COVID-19 and residents in Nursing Homes); for nursing workers’ health support, also subsidizing registration and documentation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Final considerations: valuing the phenomena manifested by families/communities, patients and health professionals is essential for early detection, intervention, and prevention of diseases.

  • Health care innovations across practice and academia: A theoretical framework
    M. Lindell Joseph, Heather Bair, Michele Williams, Diane L. Huber, Sue Moorhead, Kirsten Hanrahan, Howard Butcher, and Nai-Ching Chi

    Elsevier BV
    BACKGROUND An innovation scholarly interest group used the Jobs to Be Done Theory from the business literature to provide insight into the solution-focused progress that nurses are trying to make in challenging situations. PURPOSE This article presents a theoretical framework for understanding the progress nurses are trying to make through health care innovations across both practice and academic environments. METHOD This was a qualitative descriptive study using directed content analysis. We used the Jobs to Be Done Theory to guide the development of the semistructured questionnaire and the interpretation of findings. FINDINGS A theoretical framework of nursing innovations was derived to summarize and visually display the pathways and linkages of challenges, innovations, and impact domains of nursing innovations. Situations and opportunities arise within the context of interconnectedness and can lead to health care innovations in care delivery, patient care interventions, role transitions, research and translational methods, communication and collaboration, technology and data, teaching methods, and processes to improve care. DISCUSSION This theoretical framework offers insight into the dynamic interactions of academic-practice partnerships for innovation. Workplace situations are interconnected and can result in needed innovations designed to impact care delivery.

  • Burden and coping ability of individuals caring for chronically ill older adults in Nigeria
    Joel Olayiwola Faronbi, Howard K. Butcher, and Adenike Ayobola Olaogun

    SLACK, Inc.
    Family members play key roles in the care of older adults with chronic illness. However, little is known about the negative consequences of caregiving in Sub-Sahara Africa. The current study examined the influence of caregivers' burden and coping ability on the health-related quality of life of caregivers of older adults with chronic illness. An exploratory sequential mixed methods study was conducted among 16 family members. Findings showed that caregivers experienced severe burden, coped moderately with the burden, and had poor quality of life. Furthermore, directed content analysis of the in-depth interviews uncovered six major themes: (a) Being Pulled in Opposite Directions, (b) Experiencing Poor Health, (c) Receiving Support From Family and Friends, (d) Turning to God for Help, (e) Seeking Relief for Aching Bodies, and (f) Seeking Remedies for Sleeplessness. The current findings may have implications for designing programs that aim to improve the well-being of caregivers. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 45(1), 39-46.].

  • Secondary prevention of late-life suicide
    Howard K. Butcher and Todd N. Ingram

    SLACK, Inc.
    Suicide is a tragic, traumatic loss, and one of the most emotionally devastating events families, friends, and communities experience. Suicide claims more than 800,000 lives every year, and some of the highest rates of suicide in the United States and globally are among older adults. The purpose of this evidence-based guideline is to help health care providers recognize those at risk for suicide and recommend appropriate and effective secondary suicide prevention interventions. The information in this guideline is intended for health care providers who work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation centers, out-patient clinics, mental health clinics, home health care, and other long-term care facilities. Assessment and preventive treatment strategies were derived by exhaustive literature review and synthesis of the current evidence on secondary prevention of late-life suicide across practice settings. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(11), 20-32.].

  • Holistic Nurses’ Use of Energy-Based Caring Modalities
    Noreen Frisch, Howard K. Butcher, Diana Campbell, and Dickon Weir-Hughes

    SAGE Publications
    As part of a study of a larger study of self-identified holistic nurses, researchers asked nurses to describe practice situations where energy-based modalities (EBMs) were used. Four hundred and twenty-four nurses responded by writing free-text responses on an online survey tool. The participants were highly educated and very experienced with 42% holding graduate degrees and 77% having over 21 years of practice. Conventional content analysis revealed four themes: EMBs are 1) caring modalities used to treat a wide range of identified nursing concerns; 2) implemented across the life span and to facilitate life transitions; 3) support care for the treatment of specific medical conditions; and 4) Use of EBMs transcend labels of ‘conditions’ and are used within a holistic framework. The fourth theme reveals a shared vision of nursing work such that the modality becomes secondary and the need to address the ‘whole’ at an energetic level emerges as the primary focus of holistic nursing.

  • Evidence-based practice guideline: Elder abuse prevention
    Jeanette M. Daly and Howard K. Butcher

    SLACK, Inc.
    Elder abuse occurs in all practice settings and presents in various forms. The purpose of the current evidence-based practice guideline is to facilitate health care professionals' assessment of older adults in domestic and institutional settings who are at risk for elder abuse, and to recommend interventions to reduce the incidence of mistreatment. Limited research has been conducted on interventions to prevent or reduce elder abuse. Research is available on the prevalence of elder abuse and indicators of individuals who may be more susceptible to harm. The current article summarizes prevalence and risk factors for elder abuse, instruments available to assess individuals at risk for or victims of abuse, and potential interventions to prevent or reduce elder abuse. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(7), 21-30.].

  • Evidence-based practice guideline: Delirium
    Patricia Finch Guthrie, Shelley Rayborn, and Howard K. Butcher

    SLACK, Inc.
    Delirium is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized older adults often superimposed on dementia. Older patients with delirium are more likely than other populations to develop hospital-acquired infections, pressure ulcers, and immobility and nutritional issues, as well as to have increased health care costs, longer hospital stays, and long-term care following discharge. Interventions that prevent or mitigate the effects of delirium while promoting recovery are essential for caring for hospitalized older patients. This article is a summary of an evidence-based guideline that includes a framework for addressing delirium that focuses on predisposing and precipitating factors for delirium. In addition, the guideline includes evidence-based assessment and intervention principles, along with a review of reliable and valid assessment instruments. The guideline also identifies measurable outcomes for managing delirium and a quality improvement approach for improving outcomes. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(2), 14-24.].

  • Human Energy Field: A Concept Analysis
    Deborah Shields, Ann Fuller, Marci Resnicoff, Howard K. Butcher, and Noreen Frisch

    SAGE Publications
    The human energy field (HEF) as a phenomenon of interest across disciplines has gained increased attention over the 20th and 21st centuries. However, a concern has arisen that there is a lack of evidence to support the concept of the HEF as a phenomenon of interest to professional nurses and nursing practice. Using Chinn and Kramer’s method of creating conceptual meaning, a concept analysis was conducted for the purpose of developing a conceptual definition of HEF. A systematic review of the literature using the CINAHL database yielded a total of 81 articles and text sources that were determined to be relevant to the concept analysis. The HEF is defined as a luminous field of energy that comprises a person, extends beyond the physical body, and is in a continuous mutual process with the environmental energy field. It is a vital energy that is a continuous whole and is recognized by its unique pattern; it is dynamic, creative, nonlinear, unpredictable, and flows in lower and higher frequencies. The balanced HEF is characterized by flow, rhythm, symmetry, and gentle vibration.

  • Evidence-based practice guideline: Fall prevention for older adults
    Cheryl Kruschke and Howard K. Butcher

    SLACK, Inc.
    Falls are a major cause of injury and death annually for millions of individuals 65 and older. Older adults are at risk for falls for a variety of reasons regardless of where they live. Falls are defined as any sudden drop from one surface to a lower surface. The purpose of this fall prevention evidence-based practice guideline is to describe strategies that can identify individuals at risk for falls. A 10-step protocol including screening for falls, comprehensive fall assessment, gait and balance screening when necessary, and an individualized fall intervention program addressing specific fall risks is presented. Reassessing fall risk and fall prevention programs will ensure a proactive approach to reducing falls in the aging population. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(11), 15-21.].

RECENT SCHOLAR PUBLICATIONS

  • The Role of Metaphor in Hermeneutic Research
    HK Butcher
    Nursing Science Quarterly 37 (2), 105-108 2024

  • The Uncertainty in Family Caregivers of Hospitalized Persons With a Stroke in Saudi Arabia: Unitary Caring Perspective
    S Alselami, HK Butcher, J Longo
    Advances in Nursing Science 47 (1), 104-120 2024

  • Originating Research Ideas
    HK Butcher
    Nursing Science Quarterly 37 (1), 9-17 2024

  • Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC)-8e
    CM Wagner, HK Butcher, MF Clarke
    Elsevier Health Sciences 2024

  • Cultivating Awe: A Means to Inspire Sciencing
    HK Butcher
    Nursing Science Quarterly 36 (4), 325-332 2023

  • Biographical Narrative Research From the Perspective of the Science of Unitary Human Beings: A Methodological Approach
    Y Castao Mora, BE Arias Lpez, HK Butcher
    Nursing Science Quarterly 36 (3), 221-231 2023

  • A unitary caring theory perspective of labyrinth walking research
    HK Butcher
    Nursing Science Quarterly 36 (2), 116-125 2023

  • Factors that influence health literacy in patients with coronary artery disease
    AC Costa, AP Conceio, HK Butcher
    Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem 31, e3878 2023

  • Fatores que influenciam o letramento em sade em pacientes com doena arterial coronariana
    AC Costa, AP Conceio, HK Butcher, RCG Butcher
    Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem 31, e3878 2023

  • Factores que influyen en la alfabetizacin en salud de los pacientes con enfermedad arterial coronaria
    AC Costa, AP Conceio, HK Butcher, RCGS Butcher
    Revista latino-americana de enfermagem 31, e3878 2023

  • Community-based participatory research guided by critical caring theory
    HK Butcher
    Nursing Science Quarterly 35 (4), 400-408 2022

  • Unitary caring science: A hermeneutic-phenomenological research method
    HK Butcher
    Nursing Science Quarterly 35 (2), 148-159 2022

  • A unitary caring theory perspective of family caregiving for patients hospitalized with a stroke in Saudi Arabia
    S Alselami, HK Butcher
    Nursing Science Quarterly 35 (2), 191-202 2022

  • Blood pressure control and adherence to drug treatment in patients with hypertension treated at a specialized outpatient clinic: a cross-sectional study
    MCLP Guimares, JC Coelho, GV Silva, LF Drager, ...
    Patient preference and adherence, 2749-2761 2021

  • Motivational interviewing: validation of a proposed NIC nursing intervention in persons with a severe mental illness
    P Lozano, HK Butcher, C Serrano, A Carrasco, C Lagares, P Lusilla, ...
    International Journal of Nursing Knowledge 32 (4), 240-252 2021

  • Commentary and Book Review of Middle Range Theories: Application to Nursing Research and Practice (5th Edition) by Sandra J. Peterson and Timothy S
    HK Butcher
    Nursing Science Quarterly 34 (2), 211-216 2021

  • Instruments for Advancing Unitariology
    HK Butcher
    Martha E. Rogers' Nursing Science 2021

  • Epilogue: Sustaining Rogerian Nursing Science
    HK Butcher
    Martha E. Rogers' Nursing Science 2021

  • Brazilian Nursing Process Research Network contributions for assistance in the COVID-19 pandemic
    ALBL Barros, VM Silva, RF Santana, AMRZ Cavalcante, AF Vitor, ...
    Revista brasileira de enfermagem 73 (suppl 2), e20200798 2020

  • The 2019 Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award: Keela Herr, PhD, RN, AGSF, FGSA, FAAN—Challenges & Triumphs on the Journey to Improve Pain Care for Older Adults
    HK Butcher
    Journal of Gerontological Nursing 46 (3), 7-8 2020

MOST CITED SCHOLAR PUBLICATIONS

  • Clasificacin de intervenciones de enfermera (NIC) 5th Edition
    GM Bulechek, HK Butcher, J Dochterman
    Elsevier Health Sciences 2009
    Citations: 2096

  • Nursing interventions classification (NIC) 5e
    GM Bulechek, HK Butcher, JMC Dochterman
    Mosby 2008
    Citations: 1125

  • Nursing interventions classification (NIC) 7e
    HK Butcher, GM Bulechek, JMC Dochterman, CM Wagner
    Elsevier 2018
    Citations: 1045

  • Classificao das intervenes de enfermagem (NIC) 5th Edition
    GM Bulechek, HK Butcher, JMC Dochterman
    Elsevier 2010
    Citations: 792

  • Clasificacin de intervenciones de enfermera (NIC) 7e
    HK Butcher, GM Bulechek, JM Dochterman, CM Wagner
    Elsevier 2018
    Citations: 666

  • The experience of caring for a family member with Alzheimer’s disease
    HK Butcher, PA Holkup, KC Buckwalter
    Western journal of nursing research 23 (1), 33-55 2001
    Citations: 328

  • Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC) 6th Edition
    G Bulechek, HK Butcher, J Dochterman, C Wagner
    2013
    Citations: 275

  • Vnculos de NOC y NIC a NANDA-I y diagnsticos mdicos 3e
    M Johnson, S Moorhead, G Bulechek, H Butcher, M Maas, E Swanson
    Elsevier Health Sciences Spain 2012
    Citations: 194

  • Thematic analysis of the experience of making a decision to place a family member with Alzheimer's disease in a special care unit
    HK Butcher, PA Holkup, M Park, M Maas
    Research in Nursing & Health 24 (6), 470-480 2001
    Citations: 180

  • NOC and NIC linkages to NANDA-I and clinical conditions: supporting critical thinking and quality care
    E Johnson, M., Moorhead, S., Bulchek, G., Butcher, H., Maas, E., & Swanson
    (No Title) 2011
    Citations: 168

  • NIC Classificao das intervenes de enfermagem 6e
    B Bulechek, HK Butcher, J Dochterman, C Wagner
    Elsevier Brasil 2015
    Citations: 161

  • NANDA, NOC, and NIC linkages: Nursing diagnoses, outcomes, & interventions 2e
    M Johnson, GM Bulechek, JMC Dochterman, ML Maas, S Moorhead, ...
    Mosby 2006
    Citations: 153

  • A toolkit for ethical and culturally sensitive research: An application with indigenous communities
    CE Burnette, S Sanders, HK Butcher, JT Rand
    Ethics and social welfare 8 (4), 364-382 2014
    Citations: 141

  • Ligaes NANDA-NOC-NIC: condies clnicas: suporte ao raciocnio e assistncia de qualidade 2e
    M Johnson, S Moorhead, G Bulechek, H Butcher, M Maas, E Swanson
    Ligaes NANDA-NOC-NIC: condies clnicas: suporte ao raciocnio e 2013
    Citations: 116

  • A thematic analysis of Korean family caregivers' experiences in making the decision to place a family member with dementia in a long‐term care facility
    M Park, HK Butcher, ML Maas
    Research in nursing & health 27 (5), 345-356 2004
    Citations: 112

  • Selecting a standardized terminology for the electronic health record that reveals the impact of nursing on patient care
    C Lundberg, J Warren, J Brokel, G Bulechek, H Butcher, ...
    Online journal of nursing informatics 12 (2) 2008
    Citations: 103

  • Evidence-based practice guideline: changing the practice of physical restraint use in acute care
    HW Lach, KM Leach, HK Butcher
    Journal of gerontological nursing 42 (2), 17-26 2016
    Citations: 84

  • Evidence-based practice guideline: fall prevention for older adults
    C Kruschke, HK Butcher
    Journal of gerontological nursing 43 (11), 15-21 2017
    Citations: 80

  • Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) Edisi 6
    GM Bulechek, HK Butcher, JM Dochterman, CM Wagner
    Singapore: Elsavier, Alih Bahasa Intansari Nurjannah & Roxsana Devi Tumanggor 2016
    Citations: 78

  • Pflegeinterventionsklassifikation (NIC)
    GM Bulechek, HK Butcher, JMC Dochterman, CM Wagner, M Herrmann, ...
    Hogrefe 2016
    Citations: 71