Sumon Ghosh

Verified email at gmail.com

Senior Field Research Officer/ Infectious Diseases Division
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research (icddr,b), Bangladesh



                                                     

https://researchid.co/sumon.ghosh

Dr Sumon Ghosh is a veterinarian working in the Infectious Diseases Division of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b). In his current research project, Dr Ghosh designed the experimental methodology, recruited participants, assisted with the data analysis, and contributed theoretical knowledge to the write-up. He has more than 7 years long experience on collecting specimens from different animals and environment suspected for avian influenza virus. Aside from his current research, Dr Ghosh has involved research in rabies with the Directorate General of Health Services of Bangladesh. He has collaborated actively with researchers from diverse discipline in several projects of public health importance in Bangladesh. Dr Ghosh did his graduation in Veterinary Medicine (DVM) from Chittagong Veterinary & Animal Sciences University in Bangladesh in 2009 and post-graduation (MS) from the same institute in 2011.

EDUCATION

Master of Science (M.S.) in Animal Breeding & Genetics, 2011
Chittagong Veterinary & Animal Sciences University, Bangladesh

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) 2009
Chittagong Veterinary & Animal Sciences University, Bangladesh

RESEARCH INTERESTS

❑ Infectious Diseases Epidemiology
❑ Antimicrobial Drug Resistance
❑ Host-pathogen Interaction
❑ Vector Borne Zoonosis

13

Scopus Publications

166

Scholar Citations

7

Scholar h-index

5

Scholar i10-index

Scopus Publications

  • The Epidemiology of Melioidosis and Its Association with Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Sukanta Chowdhury, Lovely Barai, Samira Rahat Afroze, Probir Kumar Ghosh, Farhana Afroz, Habibur Rahman, Sumon Ghosh, Muhammad Belal Hossain, Mohammed Ziaur Rahman, Pritimoy Das, and Muhammad Abdur Rahim

    Pathogens, eISSN: 20760817, Published: February 2022 MDPI AG
    Melioidosis is an under-recognized fatal disease in humans, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Globally, more than 35,000 human melioidosis cases have been reported since 1911. Soil acts as the natural reservoir of B. pseudomallei. Humans may become infected by this pathogen through direct contact with contaminated soil and/or water. Melioidosis commonly occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus, who increase the occurrence of melioidosis in a population. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate to what extent diabetes mellitus affects the patient in getting melioidosis. We selected 39 articles for meta-analysis. This extensive review also provided the latest updates on the global distribution, clinical manifestation, preexisting underlying diseases, and risk factors of melioidosis. Diabetes mellitus was identified as the predominant predisposing factor for melioidosis in humans. The overall proportion of melioidosis cases having diabetes was 45.68% (95% CI: 44.8–46.57, p < 0.001). Patients with diabetes mellitus were three times more likely to develop melioidosis than patients with no diabetes (RR 3.40, 95% CI: 2.92–3.87, p < 0.001). The other potential risk factors included old age, exposure to soil and water, preexisting underlying diseases (chronic kidney disease, lung disease, heart disease, and thalassemia), and agricultural activities. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for melioidosis in patients with diabetes mellitus may be developed and shared with healthcare professionals of melioidosis endemic countries to reduce morbidity.

  • Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma with cutaneous involvement in an adolescent male: A case study
    Sumon Ghosh, Sajib Ghosh, Rownak Jahan Amin, Fahmida Chowdhury, Namala Satya Prasad, Pandurangan Prabu, and Sukanta Chowdhury

    Cancer Reports, eISSN: 25738348, Published: February 2022 Wiley
    BACKGROUND Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with skin involvement is reasonably rare. It typically occurs late in the course and is associated with a poor prognosis; however, it may also be indolent in some cases. CASE We report a case of a 15-year-old previously healthy male with Hodgkin's lymphoma who presented with multiple lymphadenopathies of axilla and serpiginous ulcerative nodular lesions involving pectoral skin. A lymph node biopsy was performed following an initial diagnostic workup for a suspected active infectious disease, which revealed a neoplastic invasion from a mixed cellularity classical HL with skin involvement. A total of six cycles of ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) chemotherapy regimen was administered to the patient. CONCLUSION In comparison to other studies, this case demonstrates that a good response is possible with standard ABVD chemotherapy.

  • Prevalence of Eimeria spp. with associated risk factors in dairy calves in Sylhet, Bangladesh
    Liton Chandra Deb, Syed Sayeem Uddin Ahmed, Chandan Chandra Baidhya, Nirmalendu Deb Nath, Sumon Ghosh, and Suman Paul

    Veterinary Medicine and Science, eISSN: 20531095, Published: 2022 Wiley
    BACKGROUND Bovine eimeriosis is thought to be very important for the productivity and health of cattle all over the world. Despite the importance of cattle farming in Sylhet, little is known about the prevalence of bovine Eimeria spp. and the risk factors connected with it. OBJECTIVES We conducted a study to evaluate the prevalence, species diversity and associated risk factors of Eimeria spp. in a population of 50 cattle farms from 12 upazilas (sub-district) in Sylhet district. METHODS Faecal samples were collected randomly from a total of 554 calves ranging in age from 1 month to 2 years old during a period of 7 months. We used Flotation and McMaster techniques for parasitological examination. Species identification was done by using their morphological and morphometric characteristics. RESULTS Out of 554 calves, 308 were found to be positive for Eimeria species (55.60%). Seven species of Eimeria were identified. Among the identified species, E. bovis (38.98%), E. zuernii (26.17%) and E. alabamensis (22.38%) were found to be the most prevalent species. Mixed and species-specific Eimeria infection were (24.73%; 95% CI 21.32-28.49) and (30.87%; 95% CI 27.17-34.84), respectively. In addition, the highest prevalence was observed at Zakigonj (68%; 95% CI 58.34-76.33) and the lowest at Companygonj (40%; 95% CI 30.94-49.80). Eimeria species intensity ranged between 50 and 76,550 oocyst per gram of faeces. Analysis of associated risk factors by using multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age, gender and body condition were significantly (p < 0.05) associated with Eimeria infection. CONCLUSIONS Based on these present findings, it can be assumed that 'coccidia belong to the most prevalent pathogens in the population of calves in the study area'. Thus, the findings of this study could be used as tools for adoptive surveillance and effective control and prevention of the disease in cattle populations in this region.

  • Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about rabies among the people in the community, healthcare professionals and veterinary practitioners in Bangladesh
    Md Sohel Rana, Afsana Akter Jahan, S.M. Golam Kaisar, Umme Ruman Siddiqi, Subir Sarker, Mst Ismat Ara Begum, Sumon Ghosh, Sudeb Sarker, Be-Nazir Ahmed, and Abul Khair Mohammad Shamsuzzaman

    One Health, eISSN: 23527714, Published: December 2021 Elsevier BV
    It is crucial to explore knowledge, attitudes and perceptions (KAP) about rabies among the people in the community, the personnel dealing with animal bite management and suspected rabies patients, including humans and animals, to facilitate intervention in improving rabies elimination strategies. In 2016, we conducted an interactive face-to-face survey in three different districts of Bangladesh to understand the extent of KAP towards rabies in the community peoples (CPs), human healthcare professionals (HCPs) and veterinary practitioners (VPs). A set of prescribed questions was employed to measure what proportion of each group possessed sufficient knowledge, positive attitudes and adequate perceptions about rabies. A total of 1133 CPs, 211 HCPs and 168 VPs were interviewed by using a standard questionnaire comprising both closed and open-ended questions. Of the CPs, 49% identified the disease correctly (i.e. rabies is caused by an animal bite or a scratch). Only 29% of the CPs were aware that a wound should be washed immediately with soap and water after an animal bite or a scratch. However, only 49% of the CPs, 65% of the HCPs and 60% of the VPs felt that it is important to consult a physician and receive post-exposure vaccine as the first line of treatment following an animal exposure. Among the HCPs, 23% of the respondents did not possess sufficient knowledge about animal bites as categorised by the World Health Organization (WHO), and 12% of the respondents did not possess the knowledge on how to manage an animal bite properly. Out of 52% of the VPs who previously treated suspected rabid animals, only 29% had a history of taking rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Lack of formal education and rural subsistence were found to largely contribute to poor rabies KAP level among the CPs (P ≤ 0.01). There has been a high demand for proper training to be provided to HCPs and VPs for the effective management of an animal bite incidence in human and animals, respectively. Multi-sectoral collaboration through integrated One Health initiatives including community education, awareness programmes, facilitation of rabies PEP, and dog vaccination as well as its population control are critical in the way forward to control rabies in Bangladesh.

  • Antibiotic usage and resistance in food animal production: What have we learned from Bangladesh?
    Sukanta Chowdhury, Sumon Ghosh, Mohammad Abdul Aleem, Shahana Parveen, Md. Ariful Islam, Md. Mahbubur Rashid, Zubair Akhtar, and Fahmida Chowdhury

    Antibiotics, eISSN: 20796382, Published: August 2021 MDPI AG
    Irrational and inappropriate use of antibiotics in commercial chicken and aquaculture industries can accelerate the antibiotic resistance process in humans and animals. In Bangladesh, the growing commercial chicken and aquaculture industries are playing significantly important roles in the food value chain. It is necessary to know the antibiotic usage practices and antibiotic resistance in food animal production to design rational policies, guidelines, and interventions. We conducted a narrative review to understand the level of antibiotic usage and resistance in food animal production in Bangladesh. Information about antibiotic usage in different food animal production systems, including commercial chickens and aquaculture in Bangladesh is inadequate. Only a few small-scale studies reported that the majority (up to 100%) of the broiler and layer chicken farms used antibiotics for treating and preventing diseases. However, numerous studies reported antibiotic-resistant bacteria of public health importance in commercial chicken, fish, livestock, and animal origin food. The isolates from different pathogenic bacteria were found resistant against multiple antibiotics, including quinolones, the third or fourth generation of cephalosporins, and polymyxins. Veterinary practitioners empirically treat animals with antibiotics based on presumptive diagnosis due to inadequate microbial diagnostic facilities in Bangladesh. Intensive training is helpful to raise awareness among farmers, feed dealers, and drug sellers on good farming practices, standard biosecurity practices, personal hygiene, and the prudent use of antibiotics. Urgently, the Government of Bangladesh should develop and implement necessary guidelines to mitigate irrational use of antibiotics in food animals using a multi-sectoral One Health approach.

  • Major zoonotic diseases of public health importance in Bangladesh
    Sukanta Chowdhury, Mohammad A. Aleem, Md Shafiqul I. Khan, Mohammad Enayet Hossain, Sumon Ghosh, and Mohammed Z. Rahman

    Veterinary Medicine and Science, eISSN: 20531095, Pages: 1199-1210, Published: July 2021 Wiley
    Zoonotic diseases cause repeated outbreaks in humans globally. The majority of emerging infections in humans are zoonotic. COVID-19 is an ideal example of a recently identified emerging zoonotic disease, causing a global pandemic. Anthropogenic factors such as modernisation of agriculture and livestock farming, wildlife hunting, the destruction of wild animal habitats, mixing wild and domestic animals, wildlife trading, changing food habits and urbanisation could drive the emergence of zoonotic diseases in humans. Since 2001, Bangladesh has been reporting many emerging zoonotic disease outbreaks such as nipah, highly pathogenic avian influenza, pandemic H1N1, and COVID-19. There are many other potential zoonotic pathogens such as Ebola, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, Kyasanur forest disease virus and Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever that may emerge in the future. However, we have a limited understanding of zoonotic diseases' overall risk in humans and associated factors that drive the emergence of zoonotic pathogens. This narrative review summarised the major emerging, re-emerging, neglected and other potential zoonotic diseases in Bangladesh and their associated risk factors. Nipah virus and Bacillus anthracis caused repeated outbreaks in humans. More than 300 human cases with Nipah virus infection were reported since the first outbreak in 2001. The highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) caused more than 550 outbreaks in poultry, and eight human cases were reported so far since 2007. People of Bangladesh are frequently exposed to zoonotic pathogens due to close interaction with domestic and peri-domestic animals. The rapidly changing intensified animal-human-ecosystem interfaces and risky practices increase the risk of zoonotic disease transmission. The narrative review's findings are useful to draw attention to the risk and emergence of zoonotic diseases to public health policymakers in Bangladesh and the application of one-health approach to address this public health threat.

  • Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from chickens in Rajshahi, Bangladesh
    Bindu R. Sarker, Sumon Ghosh, Sukanta Chowdhury, Avijit Dutta, Liton Chandra Deb, Bidhan Krishna Sarker, Tania Sultana, and Khandoker Mohammad Mozaffor Hossain

    Veterinary Medicine and Science, eISSN: 20531095, Pages: 820-830, Published: May 2021 Wiley
    Salmonellosis in poultry is an important disease that seriously impedes the development of the poultry industry. The increased resistance to antimicrobials against Salmonella has been a major public health concern worldwide. We conducted a study from January to June 2016 in and around the Rajshahi district of Bangladesh on the commercial chicken to isolate, identify and characterize poultry-specific Salmonella, to assess the potential risk factors and to determine the antimicrobial resistance pattern of the isolates. The overall prevalence of Salmonella enterica was 41% (49/120) [95% CI: 31.95%-50.17%] with 41.7% in broiler chicken (25/60) [95% CI: 29.06%-55.12%] and 40% in layer chicken (24/60, 40%) [95% CI: 27.56%-53.46%]. Samples collected from Rajshahi city (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 0.50-3.73) and Puthia Upazila (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.56-4.12) were more likely to be positive for Salmonella than Charghat Upazila. Salmonella detection was 1.3 times higher in chicken, providing loose feed than those provided ready feed. All the isolates fermented dextrose, maltose and mannitol with the production of acid and gas, but did not ferment sucrose and lactose. The isolates showed catalase, MR, citrate utilization test and TSI agar test positive, but indole and V-P tests negative. Salmonella isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin (90%), gentamycin (80%), amoxicillin (75%), streptomycin (70%), ampicillin (45%) and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (45%), whereas highly resistant to penicillin (100%) and nalidixic acid (100%) followed by sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (55%), ampicillin (40%) and amoxicillin (25%). Salmonella enterica is endemic in commercial chicken production in Bangladesh with high prevalence. A considerable proportion of Salmonella isolates was found to be resistant to the majority of the common antimicrobial drugs. A good biosecurity system could be effective for the reduction of Salmonella. It is necessary to obtain universal commitments to establish prudent antibiotic use policies.

  • Trends and clinico-epidemiological features of human rabies cases in Bangladesh 2006–2018
    Sumon Ghosh, Md. Sohel Rana, Md. Kamrul Islam, Sukanta Chowdhury, Najmul Haider, Mohammad Abdullah Heel Kafi, Sayed Mohammed Ullah, Md. Rashed Ali Shah, Afsana Akter Jahan, Hasan Sayedul Mursalin, Aung Swi Prue Marma, S. M. Emran Ali, Shohrab Hossain, Rajub Bhowmik, Nitish C. Debnath, Abul Khair Mohammad Shamsuzzaman, Be-Nazir Ahmed, Umme Ruman Siddiqi, and Sanya Tahmina Jhora

    Scientific Reports, eISSN: 20452322, Published: 1 December 2020 Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Vaccinating dogs against rabies is an effective means of reducing human rabies. We subjected 1327 clinically diagnosed human rabies death and mass dog vaccination (MDV) data during 2006–2018 to quantify the impacts of MDV on human rabies incidence in Bangladesh and a subset of rabies death data (422) for clinico-epidemiological analysis. A positive and increasing trend of MDV (p = 0.01 and tau = 0.71) and a negative and declining trend (p < 0.001 and tau = −0.88) of human rabies cases (Correlation coefficient: −0.82) have been observed. Among 422 deaths, the majority (78%) of the victims sought treatment from traditional healers, and 12% received post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). The mean incubation period of rabies in cases with exposure sites on the head & neck (35 days) was shorter than the upper limb (mean = 64 days, p = 0.02) and lower limb (mean = 89 days, p < 0.01). MDV has been found to be effective for reducing human rabies cases in Bangladesh. Creating awareness among the animal bite victims to stop reliance on traditional healers rather seeking PEP, addressing the role of traditional healers through awareness education programme with respect to the treatment of dog bites, ensuring availability of PEP, and continuing to scale up MDV may help to prevent human rabies deaths.

  • Epidemiological study of human rabies cases in Bangladesh through verbal autopsy
    Md Sohel Rana, Umme Ruman Siddiqi, Sumon Ghosh, Afsana Akter Jahan, Md Kamrul Islam, Md Rashed Ali Shah, Sayed Mohammed Ullah, S.M. Emran Ali, Be-Nazir Ahmed, and Abul Khair Mohammad Shamsuzzaman

    Heliyon, ISSN: 24058440, Published: November 2020 Elsevier BV
    Identification of risk factors is crucial to find ways to reduce rabies deaths. We investigated the hospital records of rabies deceased through contact tracing of the relatives of the victims using enhanced verbal autopsies (VA) to identify why the people had to die from rabies in recent years in Bangladesh. Patients whose deaths were confirmed by physicians based on the history of animal exposure and clinical signs were taken into account for VA. Socio-demographic profile of the deceased, animal exposure, nature of the wound, and history of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) data were obtained and analysed. The study found 256 cases in which the cause of death was attributed to rabies, most of the victims were male (71.88%), resided in the rural community (80.47%), dependent (49.22%), and children below the age of 15 years (47.27%). Dogs were the single most responsible (81.64%); however, cats (12.11%), jackals (3.91%) and mongoose (2.34%) were also found accountable for rabies incidence (P < 0.05). Significantly, limbs were the most common (67.97%) site of exposure, and the shortest incubation period was identified in the case of bites to head and face (P < 0.05). The majority (86.72%) of the deceased did not receive any PEP; whereas, 66.80% sought treatment from traditional healers. Among the deceased (13.28%, n = 34) who had received PEP, only 8.82% of them completed the full course of the vaccination regimen (P < 0.01); however, none of them had history of taking rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). The study recommends extensive public health awareness programs in the rural community and establishing methods to improve healthcare-seeking behaviours, including receiving PEP instead of visiting traditional healers. Moreover, the availability and accessibility of PEP in the government hospital facilities are desirable, and laboratory-based surveillance with compatible rapid data reporting may be incorporated in the existing policy.

  • Knowledge, attitude, and practice of a local community towards the prevention and control of rabies in Gaibandha, Bangladesh
    M Rahaman, Umme Siddiqi, Abdullah Sabuj, Be Ahmed, Sanya Tahmina, Md Faruque, Sumon Ghosh, and Nasir Uddin

    Journal of Advanced Veterinary and Animal Research, eISSN: 23117710, Pages: 414-420, Published: 1 September 2020 ScopeMed Publishing
    Objectives: Knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of rabies in the community are essential for developing post-exposure behavioral treatment and for understanding current prevention and control policy on rabies. This was a cross-sectional study in Gaibandha Sadar, a northern district of Bangladesh, investigating the level of KAP about rabies. Materials and methods: A total of 368 interviewed respondents, of whom 280 (76.09%) were male, and 88 (23.91%) were female. A structured questionnaire was used for the data collection from respondents on socio-demographic information and KAP regarding rabies. The data analyzed with STATA-IC-11.0 and the association of independent variables with rabies KAP scores were calculated using Pearson’s Chi-square. Results: Most respondents had adequate KAP levels and positive thoughts on rabies prevention. The KAP scores were strongly associated with education and employment status (p < 0.05). Most respondents said that stray dogs are a headache in the area and believed that control of the dog population in Gaibandha is essential. Conclusion: These outcomes also revealed that there is an information gap about rabies that might improve by developing an education program for awareness.

  • Detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N6) viruses in waterfowl in Bangladesh
    Genyan Yang, Sukanta Chowdury, Erin Hodges, Mohammed Ziaur Rahman, Yunho Jang, Mohammad Enayet Hossain, Joyce Jones, Thomas J. Stark, Han Di, Peter W. Cook, Sumon Ghosh, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner, John R. Barnes, David E. Wentworth, Erin Kennedy, and C. Todd Davis

    Virology, ISSN: 00426822, eISSN: 10960341, Volume: 534, Pages: 36-44, Published: August 2019 Elsevier BV
    Bangladesh has reported repeated outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5) viruses in poultry since 2007. Because of the large number of live poultry markets (LPM) relative to the population density of poultry throughout the country, these markets can serve as sentinel sites for HPAI A(H5) detection. Through active LPM surveillance during June 2016-June 2017, HPAI A(H5N6) viruses along with 14 other subtypes of influenza A viruses were detected. The HPAI A(H5N6) viruses belonged to clade 2.3.4.4 and were likely introduced into Bangladesh around March 2016. Human infections with influenza clade 2.3.4.4 viruses in Bangladesh have not been identified, but the viruses had several molecular markers associated with potential human infection. Vigilant surveillance at the animal-human interface is essential to identify emerging avian influenza viruses with the potential to threaten public and animal health.

  • The pattern of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 outbreaks in South Asia
    Chowdhury, Hossain, Ghosh, Ghosh, Hossain, Beard, Rahman, and Rahman

    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease, eISSN: 24146366, Published: 2019 MDPI AG
    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 has caused severe illnesses in poultry and in humans. More than 15,000 outbreaks in domestic birds from 2005 to 2018 and 861 human cases from 2003 to 2019 were reported across the world to OIE (Office International des Epizooties) and WHO (World Health Organization), respectively. We reviewed and summarized the spatial and temporal distribution of HPAI outbreaks in South Asia. During January 2006 to June 2019, a total of 1063 H5N1 outbreaks in birds and 12 human cases for H5N1 infection were reported to OIE and WHO, respectively. H5N1 outbreaks were detected more in the winter season than the summer season (RR 5.11, 95% CI: 4.28–6.1). Commercial poultry were three times more likely to be infected with H5N1 than backyard poultry (RR 3.47, 95% CI: 2.99–4.01). The highest number of H5N1 outbreaks was reported in 2008, and the smallest numbers were reported in 2014 and 2015. Multiple subtypes of avian influenza viruses and multiple clades of H5N1 virus were detected. Early detection and reporting of HPAI viruses are needed to control and eliminate HPAI in South Asia.

  • Awareness of rabies and response to dog bites in a Bangladesh community
    Sumon Ghosh, Sukanta Chowdhury, Najmul Haider, Rajub K. Bhowmik, Md. S. Rana, Aung S. Prue Marma, Muhammad B. Hossain, Nitish C. Debnath, and Be‐Nazir Ahmed

    Veterinary Medicine and Science, eISSN: 20531095, Pages: 161-169, Published: August 2016 Wiley
    Abstract Community awareness regarding rabies and treatment seeking behaviours are critical both for the prevention and control of the disease in human and animals. We conducted a study to explore people's awareness about rabies, their attitudes towards dogs and practices associated with treating dog bites in Satkhira Sadar, a south‐western sub‐district of Bangladesh. Of the total 3200 households (HHs) surveyed, the majority of the respondents have heard about rabies (73%) and there was a high level of awareness that dog bite is the main cause of rabies (86%), and that rabies can be prevented by vaccination (85%). However, 59% of the dog bite victims first seek treatment from traditional healers instead of visiting the hospitals, 29% received the rabies vaccine, 2% practiced proper wound washing with soap and water, while 4.8% have not taken any measures. None of the victims have received rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Of the respondents, 5.2% reported a history of dog bite in at least one family member, and 11.8% reported a history of dog bite in domestic animals during the previous year. The HHs having a higher number of family members (OR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.07–1.2), having a pet dog (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.4–3.2) and caring or feeding a community dog (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.4–2.9) showed an increased risk of getting a dog bite. Among the bite victims, 3.6% (n = 6) humans and 15.8% (n = 60) animals died. As a measure for dog population management (DPM), 56% preferred sterilization while the rest preferred killing of dogs. The current treatment seeking behaviours of the respondents should be improved through additional education and awareness programme and better availability for the provision of post‐exposure prophylaxis in Bangladesh. We recommend scaling up national mass dog vaccination and DPM to reduce the burden of rabies cases and dog bites in Bangladesh.

RECENT SCHOLAR PUBLICATIONS

  • Prevalence of Eimeria spp. with associated risk factors in dairy calves in Sylhet, Bangladesh
    L Chandra Deb, SSU Ahmed, CC Baidhya, N Deb Nath, S Ghosh, S Paul
    Veterinary Medicine and Science 8 (3), 1250-1257 2022

  • Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma with cutaneous involvement in an adolescent male: A case study
    S Ghosh, S Ghosh, RJ Amin, F Chowdhury, NS Prasad, P Prabu, ...
    Cancer Reports 5 (2), e1473 2022

  • The epidemiology of melioidosis and its association with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    S Chowdhury, L Barai, SR Afroze, PK Ghosh, F Afroz, H Rahman, ...
    Pathogens 11 (2), 149 2022

  • Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about rabies among the people in the community, healthcare professionals and veterinary practitioners in Bangladesh
    MS Rana, AA Jahan, SMG Kaisar, UR Siddiqi, S Sarker, MIA Begum, ...
    One Health 13, 100308 2021

  • Antibiotic Usage and Resistance in Food Animal Production: What Have We Learned from Bangladesh?
    S Chowdhury, S Ghosh, MA Aleem, S Parveen, MA Islam, MM Rashid, ...
    Antibiotics 10 (9), 1032 2021

  • Antibiotic Use Among Children Under 5 Years of Age in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Bangladesh
    R Sarker, MSI Khan, MA Tareq, S Ghosh, S Chowdhury
    SN Comprehensive Clinical Medicine 3 (4), 982-988 2021

  • Major zoonotic diseases of public health importance in Bangladesh
    S Chowdhury, MA Aleem, MSI Khan, ME Hossain, S Ghosh, MZ Rahman
    Veterinary Medicine and Science, 1-12 2021

  • Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from chickens in Rajshahi, Bangladesh
    BR Sarker, S Ghosh, S Chowdhury, A Dutta, LC Deb, BK Sarker, ...
    Veterinary medicine and science 7 (3), 820-830 2021

  • Socio Economic Burden of Tuberculosis among Hospitalized Patients in Dhaka City, Bangladesh
    MSISC Mahbuba Khanom, Md Shafiqul Islam Khan, Md Abu Tareq, Sumon Ghosh ...
    Clinical Medicine Pages 1 (1), 2 2020

  • Epidemiological study of human rabies cases in Bangladesh through verbal autopsy
    MS Rana, UR Siddiqi, S Ghosh, AA Jahan, MK Islam, MRA Shah, ...
    Heliyon 6 (11), e05521 2020

  • Knowledge, attitude, and practice of a local community towards the prevention and control of rabies in Gaibandha, Bangladesh
    NU M. Mujibur Rahaman1,2, Umme Ruman Siddiqi2 , Abdullah Al Momen Sabuj3 ...
    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED VETERINARY AND ANIMAL RESEARCH 7 (3), 414-420 2020

  • Trends and clinico-epidemiological features of human rabies cases in Bangladesh 2006–2018
    S Ghosh, M Rana, M Islam, S Chowdhury, N Haider, MAH Kafi, SM Ullah, ...
    Scientific reports 10 (1), 1-11 2020

  • The Pattern of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Outbreaks in South Asia
    S Chowdhury, ME Hossain, PK Ghosh, S Ghosh, MB Hossain, C Beard, ...
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease 4 (4), 138 2019

  • Detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N6) viruses in waterfowl in Bangladesh
    G Yang, S Chowdury, E Hodges, MZ Rahman, Y Jang, ME Hossain, ...
    Virology 534, 36-44 2019

  • Pattern of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Circulation among Domestic Poultry in Bangladesh: 2007-2017
    EK S. Chowdhury, S. Khan, M. Rahman, M. Hossain, S. Ghosh, P. Ghosh, N ...
    International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases (ICEID), 10 2018

  • Death from clinically identifyable human rabies cases in Bangladesh: A survey through verbal autopsy.
    S Ghosh
    International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases (ICEID), 86 2018

  • Community based surveillance to detect avian influenza in backyard poultry in Bangladesh
    SSUAEDK Sukanta Chowdhury, Amy Molitoris, Ziaur Rahman, Enayet Hossain ...
    International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases (ICEID) 2018

  • Awareness of rabies and response to dog bites in a Bangladesh community
    S Ghosh, S Chowdhury, N Haider, RK Bhowmik, MS Rana, ...
    Veterinary medicine and science 2 (3), 161-169 2016

  • Production Performances of Japanese Quail Parent Stock under Open Housing System
    MB Hossain, PC Sen, MA al Noman, A Islam, S Ghosh, S Islam, ...
    Journal of Embryo Transfer 30 (2), 115-119 2015

  • Identification of the suitable milk recording protocol for small-scale dairy production.
    S Ghosh, MKI Khan
    International Journal of Dairy Science 9 (4), 124-131 2014

MOST CITED SCHOLAR PUBLICATIONS

  • Awareness of rabies and response to dog bites in a Bangladesh community
    S Ghosh, S Chowdhury, N Haider, RK Bhowmik, MS Rana, ...
    Veterinary medicine and science 2 (3), 161-169 2016
    Citations: 51

  • Trends and clinico-epidemiological features of human rabies cases in Bangladesh 2006–2018
    S Ghosh, M Rana, M Islam, S Chowdhury, N Haider, MAH Kafi, SM Ullah, ...
    Scientific reports 10 (1), 1-11 2020
    Citations: 24

  • The Pattern of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Outbreaks in South Asia
    S Chowdhury, ME Hossain, PK Ghosh, S Ghosh, MB Hossain, C Beard, ...
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease 4 (4), 138 2019
    Citations: 21

  • Detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N6) viruses in waterfowl in Bangladesh
    G Yang, S Chowdury, E Hodges, MZ Rahman, Y Jang, ME Hossain, ...
    Virology 534, 36-44 2019
    Citations: 14

  • Status of Household s Ducks and their Associated Factors under Scavenging System in a Southern Area of Bangladesh
    S Ghosh, N Haider, MKI Khan
    International Journal of Natural Sciences 2 (4), 108-111 2012
    Citations: 13

  • Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from chickens in Rajshahi, Bangladesh
    BR Sarker, S Ghosh, S Chowdhury, A Dutta, LC Deb, BK Sarker, ...
    Veterinary medicine and science 7 (3), 820-830 2021
    Citations: 9

  • Major zoonotic diseases of public health importance in Bangladesh
    S Chowdhury, MA Aleem, MSI Khan, ME Hossain, S Ghosh, MZ Rahman
    Veterinary Medicine and Science, 1-12 2021
    Citations: 7

  • Knowledge, attitude, and practice of a local community towards the prevention and control of rabies in Gaibandha, Bangladesh
    NU M. Mujibur Rahaman1,2, Umme Ruman Siddiqi2 , Abdullah Al Momen Sabuj3 ...
    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED VETERINARY AND ANIMAL RESEARCH 7 (3), 414-420 2020
    Citations: 6

  • Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about rabies among the people in the community, healthcare professionals and veterinary practitioners in Bangladesh
    MS Rana, AA Jahan, SMG Kaisar, UR Siddiqi, S Sarker, MIA Begum, ...
    One Health 13, 100308 2021
    Citations: 5

  • Epidemiological study of human rabies cases in Bangladesh through verbal autopsy
    MS Rana, UR Siddiqi, S Ghosh, AA Jahan, MK Islam, MRA Shah, ...
    Heliyon 6 (11), e05521 2020
    Citations: 5

  • Identification of the suitable milk recording protocol for small-scale dairy production.
    S Ghosh, MKI Khan
    International Journal of Dairy Science 9 (4), 124-131 2014
    Citations: 5

  • Antibiotic Usage and Resistance in Food Animal Production: What Have We Learned from Bangladesh?
    S Chowdhury, S Ghosh, MA Aleem, S Parveen, MA Islam, MM Rashid, ...
    Antibiotics 10 (9), 1032 2021
    Citations: 4

  • The epidemiology of melioidosis and its association with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    S Chowdhury, L Barai, SR Afroze, PK Ghosh, F Afroz, H Rahman, ...
    Pathogens 11 (2), 149 2022
    Citations: 1

  • Production Performances of Japanese Quail Parent Stock under Open Housing System
    MB Hossain, PC Sen, MA al Noman, A Islam, S Ghosh, S Islam, ...
    Journal of Embryo Transfer 30 (2), 115-119 2015
    Citations: 1

Publications

Ghosh, S., Rana, M.S., Islam, M.K. et al. Trends and clinico-epidemiological features of human rabies cases in Bangladesh 2006–2018. Sci Rep 10, 2410 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-59109-w
Chowdhury, S.; Hossain, M.E.; Ghosh, P.K.; Ghosh, S.; Hossain, M.B.; Beard, C.; Rahman, M.; Rahman, M.Z. The Pattern of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Outbreaks in South Asia. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4, 138.
Yang G, Chowdury S, Hodges E, Rahman MZ, Jang Y, Hossain ME, Jones J, Stark TJ, Di H, Cook PW, Ghosh S. Detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N6) viruses in waterfowl in Bangladesh. Virology. 2019 May 28.
Ghosh, S., Chowdhury, S., Haider, N., Bhowmik, R. K., Rana, Md. S., Prue Marma, A. S., Hossain, M. B., Debnath, N. C. and Ahmed, B.-N. (2016), Awareness of rabies and response to dog bites in a Bangladesh community. Vet Med Sci, 2: 161–169. doi:10.1002/vms3.30
Ghosh S, Khan MK. Identification of the Suitable Milk Recording Protocol for Small-scale Dairy Production. International Journal of Dairy Science. 2014;9(4):124-31.
Ghosh S, Haider N and Khan MKI. 2012. Status of Household’s Ducks and their Associated Factors under Scavenging System in a Southern Area of Bangladesh. International Journal of Natural Sciences, 2(4):108-11
Hossain MB, Sen PC, al Noman MA, Islam A, Ghosh S, Islam S, Chakma S, Paul AK. Production Performances of Japanese Quail Parent Stock under Open Housing System. J. Emb. Trans. (2015) Vol. 30, No. 2, pp. 115 ~119
Khan MKI and Ghosh S, 2013. Test-day Milk Recording Systems under Small-holder Dairy Farming: A review. Journal of Animal Scientists, 2(2): 15-19